Goldfinger / Deadpool 2

Do you expect us to talk? Because we're going to...talk about Goldfinger, that is!

Hello and welcome again to Macintosh & Maud Havent Seen What? This week, Macintosh & Maud witness the Bond movie by which all others are judged. The story, the design, the characters - all of it comes right back to this film. From the theme song, to the car, to the villains, Macintosh and Maud present this week’s review of he 1964 Bond masterpiece, Goldfinger.

After the break, everyone's favorite merc with the mouth is back, and we've got our review! Deadpool 2 is both surprisingly touching and even more ridiculously vulgar as the first. Which is to say - it's pretty f***ing awesome.

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Intro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

Excerpts from Goldfinger are copyright 1964, United Artists Corporation and Danjaq, LLC. You can purchase the film on all streaming platforms, and it is streaming for Amazon Prime customers through June 1, 2018.

Excerpt taken from "Goldfinger (Main Title)" written and composed by Leslie Bricusse, Anthony Newley and John Barry, and performed by the incomparable Dame Shirley Bassey. Song available as part of the "Best of Bond...James Bond (Deluxe Edition)" compilation at Amazon or iTunes℗ 2012 Capitol Records LLC.

Excerpt taken from "Thunderball" written and composed by John Barry and Don Black, and performed by the legendary Tom Jones. Song available as part of the "Best of Bond...James Bond (Deluxe Edition)" compilation at Amazon or iTunes℗ 2012 Capitol Records LLC.

From Russia With Love

Bond is back and soooooo much better. Like at least 79 million dollars better. [CONTENT WARNING: SUICIDE 17:30-18:30]

Hello and welcome again to Macintosh & Maud Haven't Seen What?! This week, we're much more excited for Bond as he travels through Turkey and the heart of the Soviet empire. He's more confident, smoother with the ladies, and has that fantastic Scottish brogue. Throw in some tough villains and an actual gadget and we're all in! Enjoy our review of Bond's 1963 adventure, From Russia With Love!

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Intro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

Excerpt taken from "From Russia With Love" written and composed by Lionel Bart and sung by Matt Monro. Song available as part of the "Best of Bond...James Bond (Deluxe Edition)" compilation at Amazon or iTunes℗ 2012 Capitol Records LLC.

Excerpt taken from "Goldfinger (Main Title)" written and composed by Leslie Bricusse, Anthony Newley and John Barry, and performed by the incomparable Dame Shirley Bassey. Song available as part of the "Best of Bond...James Bond (Deluxe Edition)" compilation at Amazon or iTunes℗ 2012 Capitol Records LLC.

 

Dr. No / A Quiet Place

Name's Maud. Macintosh & Maud. And we're here to talk about the 1962 film debut of one James Bond.

Hello again, and welcome to an exciting new series from Macintosh & Maud Haven't Seen What?! This week: The Walther PPK. Bond Girls. A vodka martini, shaken, not stirred. Macintosh & Maud are jumping straight in to James Bond's first screen appearance and let's just say it was a bit underwhelming. Still, Sean Connery is perfectly dreamy and a little devilish to boot - we just hope the rest of the movies can catch up to his charm. Enjoy our review of 1962's Dr. No!

After the break, a quick review of John Krasinski's horror flick with a big heart, A Quiet Place. It's really really good and you should totally see it. Unless you're a parent and/or you hate horror movies. Then you might wanna skip this one.

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Intro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

Funny Face / Avengers: Infinity War

You voted for it. So now you get to hear us complain about it. We think it's only fair.

Hello and welcome again to Macintosh and Maud Haven’t Seen What?! This week, we try to decide what’s worse - how bad this movie is, or how bad Audrey Hepburn sings in it. Fred Astaire does his best to entertain, but nothing in the known universe can save a musical from a bad script, bad songs and bad awkward acting. You voted for it, and now you get to hear us complain about it. Enjoy our review of 1957’s Funny Face!

After the break we very reluctantly give a spoiler-free review of the seriously big deal Avengers: Infinity War. Overall, it's got heart and humor, and we genuinely enjoyed it. And that's all we're gonna say for now, though there could be a spoilercast soon. We'll let you know.

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Intro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

Excerpts from the songs "Funny Face," "'S Wonderful," "How Long Has This Been Going On?," "Bonjour, Paris," and "Clap Yo' Hands" all taken from YouTube. All songs are from the original soundtrack to Funny Face. ℗© 1996 The Verve Music Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, IncYou can purchase the album on Amazon or iTunes. Or don't and spare yourself from Audrey Hepburn's really bad singing.

Excerpt of the song "Venus" by Shocking Blue taken from YouTube. ℗© Red Bullet. Find this song and their other albums at Amazon or iTunes. Seriously, Shocking Blue is a killer psychedelic pop band from The Netherlands that's worth the price of admission.

Excerpt of the song "New York, New York" from On The Town taken from YouTube. Copyright Heaven And Earth Music. The original soundtrack with Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra is available on Amazon and iTunes.

Excerpt of the "James Bond Theme" taken from YouTube. ℗ 2013 Trunk Records. Soundtrack to Dr. No can be purchased on Amazon or iTunes

Can't Hardly Wait (WITH SPECIAL GUEST!!!)

Re-releasing last week's episode to fix iTunes feed issues. Happy listening!

It's our FIRST EVER GUEST as James from Unabashedly Obsessed and Blink and You'll Miss It is here to help use tackle a coming-of-age classic.

Hello, and welcome to part 2 of a special two-part Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! Macintosh and Maud are joined by James from Unabashedly Obsessed and Blink and You’ll Miss It to talk through a truly epic teen comedy. We talk about the 90’s teen hive mind, agree to disagree about Tom Cruise, and talk through maybe one of the best soundtracks ever released. Enjoy this extra-special review of the 1998 classic Can’t Hardly Wait!

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Intro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

Excerpts from the following songs were taken from YouTube and are available on the Can't Hardly Wait Soundtrack, available via Amazon or iTunes. 1998 Elektra Entertainment Group, A Division of Warner Communications Inc. for the United States and WEA International Inc. for the world outside of the United States. © 1998 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. 

  • "Graduate" - Third Eye Blind
  • "Can't Get Enough of You Baby" - Smash Mouth
  • "Dammit" - blink-182
  • "I Walked In" - Brougham
  • "Turn It Up (remix) / Fire it Up [Clean]" - Busta Rhymes
  • "Hit Em Wit Da Hee (Remix)" - Missy Elliott & Missy Elliott feat. Lil' Kim and Mocha
  • "Swing My Way (Remix)" - KP & Envyi
  • "Flashlight" - Parliament
  • "It's Tricky" - Run-DMC
  • "High" - Feeder
  • "Tell Me What to Say" - Black Lab
  • "Farther Down" - Matthew Sweet
  • "Can't Hardly Wait" - The Replacements
  • "Umbrella" - Dog's Eye View
  • "Paradise City" - Guns N' Roses

Excerpt from "Turn It Up" by Busta Rhymes taken from YouTube.  1997 Elektra Entertainment Group. © 1997 Elektra Entertainment Group. You can buy the track or the album, When Disaster Strikes, at Amazon or iTunes.

Excerpt from "Romeo and Juliet" by DIre Straits taken from YouTube.  1996 Mercury Records Ltd. (London), under license to Warner Bros. Records © 2000 Warner Bros. Records Inc. You can purchase the song at Amazon or iTunes.

Excerpt from "6 Underground" by Sneaker Pimps taken from YouTube.  2000 Clear Up Records Ltd. under exclusive license to Virgin Records America. All rights reserved. © 2000 Clear Up Records Ltd. You can purchase the song at Amazon or iTunes.

Excerpt from "Open Road Song" by Eve 6 taken from YouTube. Copyright 1997 BMG Entertainment. You can purchase the song at Amazon or iTunes.

Excerpt from "Cold Beverage" by G. Love & Special Sauce taken from YouTube. (P) 1994 Sony Music Entertainment Inc. You can purchase the song at Amazon or iTunes.

Excerpt from "Mandy" as performed by Me First and the Gimme Gimmes taken from YouTube. (C) 1997 Fat Wreck Chords. You can purchase the song at Amazon or iTunes.

She's All That

We're re-releasing last week's episodes to fix iTunes problems. Happy listening!

What do you get when you have stiff actors and a terrible director? Maybe the most iconic teen comedy ever made...

Hello, and welcome to Part 1 of a very special week of Macintosh & Maud Haven't Seen What?! This week, Maud has Macintosh catch up on an iconic and awful teen Pygmalion remake. Iconic because it launched a thousand jokes and imitators. Awful because it's a complete garbage fire of a film. Enjoy our review of 1999's She's All That!

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Intro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

Excerpt from "Kiss Me" by Sixpence None the Richer taken from Youtube. ℗ 1996 Squint Entertainment. You can find the song on Amazon or iTunes. Or on any adult contemporary station literally ANYWHERE.

Excerpt from "Dammit" by blink-182 taken from YouTube. ℗© 2008 Geffen Records. Forget just buying the song - you should buy all of Dude Ranch via Amazon or iTunes. Or, you know, just get this track. Your call.

Singles / Isle of Dogs

In another universe, these two movies would've been much better. But alas, we are not in that universe.

Hello, and welcome to another episode of Macintosh & Maud Haven't Seen What?! This week, Macintosh and Maud are wearing their flannel and combat boots as they dive in to the early-90's grunge scene! If only the plot and characters and overall vibe of the movie had worked just a little bit better. Enjoy our review of Cameron Crowe's 1992 love letter to the Emerald City, Singles!

After the break, we talk about watching isle of Dogs. It wasn't very good. That's all you gotta know.

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Intro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

Excerpts of the following songs taken from YouTube, and can be found on the 25th Anniversary Deluxe Edition of the Original Motion Picture Soundtrack to the film Singles [(P) 2017 Epic Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment], which you can buy at Amazon or iTunes:

  • "Spoon Man" - Chris Cornell
  • "Touch Me I'm Dick" - Citizen Dick
  • "It Ain't Like That (Live)" - Alice in Chains
  • "Would?" - Alice in Chains
  • "Breath" - Pearl Jam
  • "Seasons" - Chris Cornell
  • "Dyslexic Heart" - Paul Westerberg
  • "Battle of Evermore [Live]" - The Lovemongers
  • "Chloe Dancer / Crown of Thorns" - Mother Love Bone
  • "Birth Ritual" - Soundgarden
  • "State of Love and Trust" - Pearl Jam
  • "Overblown" - Mudhoney
  • "Waiting for Somebody" - Paul Westerberg
  • "May This Be Love?" - Jimi Hendrix
  • "Nearly Lost You" - Screaming Trees
  • "Drown" - Smashing Pumpkins

Excerpt from "I'll Be There for You [Theme from Friends]" by The Rembrandts taken from YouTube. ℗© 2006 Rhino Entertainment Company, a Warner Music Group compan. You can buy the song on their Greatest Hits collection at Amazon or iTunes.

Excerpt from "Dig for Fire" by Pixies taken from YouTube. ℗© 1990 4AD Lt. You should go out and buy everything Pixies ever made from 1988-1991, but you can also get the song itself at Amazon or iTunes. Do yourself a favor, though, and just buy all of their stuff.

In the Mood for Love / Ready Player One

It’s the most nervous Macintosh has ever been as we discuss one of his all-time favorite foreign films... 

Hello! and welcome to another episode of Macintosh and Maud Haven’t Seen What?! This week Macintosh transports Maud to 1960’s Hong Kong for a timeless film that redefines what a screen romance can be. Though he is on pins and needles hoping this movie holds up as well as when he saw it in high school... Enjoy this review of Wong Kar Wai’s 2000 classic In the Mood for Love!

Then, after the break, we saw Ready Player One. Maud enjoyed it as standard popcorn fare. Mac? Well...he might have some bigger opinions on the matter...

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Intro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

Excerpt from “SexyBack” by Justin Timberlake feat. Timbaland taken from YouTube. (P) 2006 RCA/JIVE Label Group, a unit of Sony Music Entertainment. You can find this literally anywhere. It’s JT for crying out loud.

Excerpt from "Yumeji's Theme" by Shigeru Umebayashitaken from YouTube. ℗ First Name Soundtracks / Lantis Company Limited © Lantis Company Limited. Soundtrack appears to be out of print, but the song can be purchased at Amazon or iTunes.

Excerpt from “Aquellos Ojos Verdes” performed by Nat King Cole taken from YouTube. ℗ 2015 ISJRDigital. You can purchase the song at Amazon or iTunes.

Excerpt from “Angkor Wat Finale” by Michael Galasso taken from YouTube. (P)(C) 2000 Block 2 Pictures / Paradis Films. Soundtrack is out of print, but you can find the CD, used, available at Amazon.

Excerpt from "The Rockafeller Skank" by Fatboy Slim taken from YouTube. ℗ 1998 Skint Records under exclusive license to Astralwerks. You can purchase the song at Amazon or iTunes.

Hello, Dolly! / Annihilation

Sometimes a musical just needs to stay a musical, especially if you’re not going to film it well.

Welcome again to Macintosh & Maud Haven't Seen What?! This week, we set our sights on 1890's New York and discuss the wiles of Ms. Dolly Levi and her schemes to find love. At least, that's what we would've done had Walter Matthau not been such a jerk. Enjoy our review of Hello, Dolly!

After the break, we get into a debate about whether Alex Garland’s Annihilation was an interesting and thoughtful addition to the sci-fi universe, or a total garbage pile. The answer is...well, it’s complicated.

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Intro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

Excerpts from "Ribbons Down My Back", "Put on Your Sunday Clothes", "It Only Takes a Moment" and "Hello, Dolly!" all taken from YouTube. ℗© 1994 UMG Recordings, Inc. All songs can be found on the 1969 Original Cast Recording of Hello, Dolly!, which you can purchase on Amazon, iTunes, or your favorite music platform.

Excerpt from "Yumeji's Theme" by Shigeru Umebayashi taken from YouTube. ℗ First Name Soundtracks / Lantis Company Limited © Lantis Company Limited. Soundtrack appears to be out of print, but the song can be purchased at Amazon or iTunes.

Harold and Maude / Tomb Raider, Thoroughbreds

"L-I-V-E! Live! Otherwise you got nothing to talk about in the locker room."

Welcome once again to another exciting episode of Macintosh & Maud Haven't Seen What?! This week, we kick off our "Love is In the Air" series by discussing love, life and happiness through the romance of a suicide-obsessed 17-year-old and a car-jacking, smooth-talking septugenarian. It's Harold and Maude!

After the break, we double down on new movies and talk about the new and improved, action-packed Tomb Raider and the unsettling and subtle Thoroughbreds. Both deliver on exactly what the audience came for, and both (depending on your mood) are well worth watching. Just, you know, make sure you get the popcorn for one of them...

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Intro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

Excerpts from "Don't Be Shy" and "If You Want to Sing Out, Sing Out" by Cat Stevens taken from YouTube. Both songs ℗© 2006 Universal-Island Records Ltd. They can be purchased digitally on Amazon; the original Harold and Maude soundtrack is currently out of print.

Excerpt from "Hello, Dolly!" taken from YouTube. ℗© 1994 UMG Recordings, Inc. The song and full movie cast recording of the musical can be purchased via Amazon or iTunes.

SPECIAL SEASON FINALE: Oscar Wrap-Up and Season 2 Preview

The 90th Academy Awards are over, and we've got opinions to share. LOTS of them.

The film year has come to a close (or beginning, depending on how you view things) and we've got our breakdown on the awards and our feelings about them. It was a solid, fun year with good jabs and goofs, but overall wound up being a safe year for the Academy voters. We weren't angry with too many choices...just a little disappointed in the Academy's picks overall.

After our discussion, we've got a short preview of what we're calling Season 2 (or Phase 2) of the podcast. We've got more themed films planned, more segments and fun, and overall good times for everyone. We're excited about starting again in two weeks and hope to see you there!

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

SPECIAL: Oscar Songs! Ballots! Fun!

We've got a music special and a ballot breakdown for the Oscars. Check out the show notes this week for so many fun links and things to listen to.

As a special pre-Oscars offering, we’re breaking down the five nominees for Best Original Song! We have opinions and we’re not afraid of sharing them for a fairly strong crop of songs. Except for one. A very specific one.

Then, we’re getting our snacks in order, our bubbly on ice and our ballots ready for the 90th Academy Awards on Sunday. We've got final discussion of our stone-cold locks to win and talk about the stakes. A hint - someone's gonna win this year, and someone's gonna feel the pain...

Links to each of the nominated songs below: 

Audio from Paul F. Tompkins' "Phantom Threame" pulled from Demi Adejuyigbe's YouTube trailer video, and performed by Paul F. Tompkins (Vocals), Jim Boggia (Ukulele), Eban Schletter (Theremin) and Tony Thaxton (Drums). You can see the hilarious, wonderful thread (hehe) via Twitter.

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Intro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

Titanic (1997)

Every night in my dreams / I fear for / the memories / of just how bad James Cameron's / script waaaaass...

We're closing out our Best Picture winners series with the much-beloved, insanely expensive and wildly successful Titanic from 1997. David's never seen this movie, and Diana saw it 6 TIMES in the theater. In what has to be one of the most bizarre movie experiences of all time, this may be the worst dialogue in one of the best-directed movies we've ever seen. This is a visual masterpiece, but don't expect to be wowed by the dumb love triangle with ultra-cheesy lines. We're all in on the technical trivia, the sheer charm and charisma of Leonardo DiCaprio, the ridiculously awkward performance of Kate Winslet, and a laundry list of Oscar nominations. Hold on to the rails as we dissect this movie like the iceberg sliced the Titanic.

After that, we talk about Game Night. It’s hilarious. It’s a movie. Go see it!

LATER THIS WEEK: Oscars Special!

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

The French Connection (1971)

We might have had nicer things to say about this movie. But then we saw the Oscar nominees for 1971...

Before reviewing this movie, we recognized that William Friedkin's The French Connection was a groundbreaking and unique film. It undoubtedly has one of the greatest car chases ever committed to celluloid. But maaaan is this movie a hot mess. We argue about whether the problem with the movie is the screenplay or the director, and get a little huffy about sloppy style.

But mostly, we marvel at the sheer number of awards this movie won while STANLEY FREAKING KUBRICK had released A Clockwork Orange the same year. Oh, and Peter Bogdanovich gave us his masterpiece, The Last Picture Show. AND a little musical called Fiddler on the Roof came out. HOW DID THIS MOVIE WIN ALL THESE OSCARS?!?

Then we talk about Black Panther, the most anticipated superhero movie...well of all time. It didn't disappoint, with a stellar cast, some killer costumes and badass fight scenes and villians. Oh, and some interesting socio-political conflict just for fun. It's great - go see it.

NEXT WEEK: Titanic (1997).

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

Kramer v. Kramer (1979)

It's the biggest bummer movie of all time as we watch the Kramer family fall apart. So, FUN!

Whew. This was a movie your friendly neighborhood co-hosts have been avoiding for a LONG time. And why would we be into it? It's a 2-hour film chronicling the drawn-out custody battle of a family torn apart by divorce. Oh, and it's incredibly sexist despite trying to be real and edgy. If not for Dustin Hoffman, Meryl Streep and the adorable 8-year-old Justin Henry, this movie would be near-impossible to watch. But there's something about watching Dustin Hoffman and Justin Henry walking around the house in their underwear that helps us swallow the rest of the movie.

After the break, we talk about our last Best Picture nominee, Call Me By Your Name , which may just be as good as any movie this year. Armie Hammer got robbed, Timotheé Chalamet is amazing and the Italian countryside is just GORGEOUS.

NEXT WEEK: The French Connection (1971).

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

The Sting (1973)

Be honest - you'd get conned too if Robert Redford and Paul Newman were running it against you.

The Set-Up. The Hook. The Tale. The Wire, The Shut-Out, The Sting. This week we fall into the long con with 1973's Best Picture, The Sting. George Roy Hill puts together a smart, deliberate film that takes its time to set up the con and hooks you in. It doesn't hurt that two dreamy dudes are running the game, either. Just be careful you don't lose your money to these talented grifters.

After the break, we talk about the movie destined to award Gary Oldman his first Oscar, The Darkest Hour. While we're pretty sure this movie's winning for Best Actor (and Best Makeup), there's just no way this is winning much else. In a year full of unique and visionary film, this is the most run-of-the-mill, Oscar-bait movies out. And it doesn't help that it's mostly a big puff piece for a pretty awful dude. But it's a good movie, we guess.

NEXT WEEK: Kramer v. Kramer (1979).

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

Rain Man (1988)

Rain Man isn't so much a Best Picture as the best of a series of movies you might catch on basic cable on a Sunday afternoon...

SPOILER ALERT: We reviewed the costume design in-depth for Phantom Thread. If you don't want to hear spoilers, it's tagged to the end of the episode, so you can simply stop after the final music.

This week we watched 1988's Best Picture, Rain Man. The script has the same sensitivity and thoughtful understanding of autism as a brick fused with a giant boulder, and the only redeeming character also happens to be the one who has the least ability to relate to other people. We're all for Dustin Hoffman's Oscar-worthy performance, and even get some shining moments from Tom Cruise. But honestly, even though this is a pretty good movie, we have to wonder - what happened to make this the best film of 1988? Was it just that bad?

After the break, we talk about Paul Thomas Anderson's latest venture, Phantom Thread. Daniel Day-Lewis retires not with a bang, but with a subtle, twisted performance with a ton of wicked humor. Lesley Manville might just be our pick for Best Supporting Actress, and we get into a fight over Jonny Greenwood's fantastic or atrocious Mr. Rogers-esque score. 

NEXT WEEK: The Sting (1973).

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

Special: OSCAR NOMINATIONS

Oscar Nominations are out which means it's time to praise AND yell at the Academy for their decisions.

If you've been listening to our podcast so far, you know we're laser-focused on the Oscars. And Tuesday morning, the race for the golden dude officially started. We're here to talk about all of our feelings on the nominees, the admittedly few snubs, and the movies we haven't (and some we DEFINITELY won't) seen yet. 6 weeks until the ceremony, and we're getting ready for a deep Oscar dive.

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

The Apartment (1960)

It's a miracle of epic proportions - we both agree this is a perfect movie.

This week, David has Diana watch The Apartment, Billy Wilder's masterpiece and the 1960 Best Picture. This delightful, charming and dark romantic comedy beat PsychoSpartacus, and Inherit the Wind across the board. Jack Lemmon is a national treasure, Shirley MacLaine is delightfully melancholy and Billy Wilder has an uncanny ability to let a scene play out simply and perfectly. We have no complaints, and that's saying a lot - this is a MUST see.

NEXT WEEK: Rain Man (1988).

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957)

War is madness, like the madness of a British colonel aiding the enemy. Or blowing up a bridge. That kind of stuff. 

BIG episode today! We start by reviewing the 1957 classic war drama  The Bridge on the River Kwai . We adore Alec Guinness and enjoy William Holden, but we think we should tighten things up. A lot. Still, we have no argument against the movie being that year’s Best Picture - mostly because we haven't seen any of the others...

After that, it's a big helping of new movies and award news. We review about The Post, an Oscar-bait film that nevertheless makes for a pretty good watch; Diana reviews Coco with a special appearance from our kids-movie correspondent, Lucy; and we make the rounds on the big movie winners at the Golden Globes last weekend. We're chock-block full of movies this week, so enjoy!

NEXT WEEK: The Apartment (1960). 

You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram (macintosh.and.maud) and Facebook.

If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe and review on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends.

Music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.