Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

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CW: Suicide, war, military discussions, nuclear threats, Cold War

We’re back for our 3rd season of movies, and we’re kicking off the year by going through the works of legendary director Stanley Kubrick. For our first entry, David has Diana watch the 1964 Cold War satire Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. This was David’s first foray into a life-long love of Kubrick, but as we quickly learn, Kubrick’s refusal to provide context will be a bit of an issue throughout our series. Peter Sellers is incredible, the airplane sequences truly hold up, but if you’re not read up on the insanity of Cold War America and the nuclear threat, this movie might leave you behind. It’s going to be a fascinating month as we explore the stories, the trivia, and the debates surrounding Kubrick’s work this month on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?!

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Clip from “The Bomb Run” composed by Laurie Johnson based on the folk song “Johnny Comes Marching Home Again.” Performed by the Prague City Philharmonic Orchestra, copyright 1999 Silva Screen Records America, Inc.

All clips from the film Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb © 1963, renewed 1991 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Clip from “Also Sprach Zarathustra” composed by Richard Strauss and performed by the Berlin Philharmonic, conducted by Karl Böhm. ℗ 1968 Polydor International GmbH (Hamburg).

Intro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

BONUS: Five Feet Apart

BONUS: Five Feet Apart